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Apostrophe

Grade Level Grade 8, Grade 10
Resource Type Lesson Plan

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Form: One

Subject: Communication studies

Topic: Punctuation

Sub-Topic: Apostrophe (‘)

Objective(s): At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

  • Identify apostrophe in sentences/passages
  • Construct sentences using the apostrophe.
  • Explain the uses of the apostrophe

Previous knowledge:   Students are familiar with apostrophe in primary school.

Resource(s):               A comprehensive English Course Bk.3

Introduction:             Teacher presents to class a scenario about the ‘apostrophe’. Strike three! You're out!''

Do you like baseball? In baseball, many teams have a person called a utility player. This player isn't assigned to just one position but is skilled enough to play in different locations on the field. Utility players are a big help because a coach can put them wherever the team needs the most help.

Like utility players, apostrophes are used in different parts of the English language. An apostrophe is a type of punctuation mark that looks like a floating comma. Can you pick out the apostrophe in this picture?

Which one is the apostrophe?

If you said ''letter C,'' you're exactly right! Now that you know what apostrophes look like, let's learn about how to use them.

Procedure

Step one:        Teacher asks: Has your class ever had a substitute teacher? A substitute teacher is not your regular teacher, but he or she is doing the same job (and not taking the class up on its suggestion to have all-day recess).

An apostrophe is like a substitute teacher when it's used in a contraction. A contraction is where two words are combined together to make one. Certain letters are removed from the words and replaced by an apostrophe. The apostrophe becomes a substitute for the missing letters.

Here are some common contractions and what they mean:

Common contractions

There are a lot of them, and these aren't even all of them. Teacher provides examples to class. What contractions could you use in the following sentence? Have students come to the board to write the contraction and practice writing the apostrophe. Teacher assists pupils and discusses the use and how they are properly written.

  • At the toy store, do not forget that I am going to buy rubber chickens and you are going to buy itching powder.

If students’ corrections were: don'tI'm, and you're, then you're exactly right. The sentence with contractions should read:

  • At the toy store, don't forget that I'm going to buy rubber chickens and you're going to buy itching powder.

Step two:        Allow students to read the corrected sentences after correcting the sentences using the apostrophe.

Step Three:    Teacher poses a question: How is a contraction like a substitute teacher? Teacher gives each student an index card. Assign each partner pair a word/contraction pair and have them write on the index cards. For example, one student in the pair will write 'I am' on one index card while the other student will write 'I'm' on the other index card. Collect cards and redistribute to students, lying face down on desks. Tell students that on your go they should silently look for their partner and stand next to them when found. Give them a signal to use to show they're ready to be checked, such as raising their hand or giving a 'thumbs up. After all students have found their partner, have them read the index cards aloud to check with classmates. Collect cards and keep for later use as a memory game.

Application/Assessment:      Worksheets provided. Write the shortened form of the words. Identify the words that are incorrectly written and rewrite the passage using the correct punctuation form (‘)

Evaluation:

Form: One

Subject: Communication studies

Topic: Punctuation

Sub-Topic: Apostrophe (‘)

Objective(s): At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

  • Identify apostrophe in sentences/passages
  • Construct sentences using the apostrophe.
  • Explain the uses of the apostrophe

Previous knowledge:   Students are familiar with apostrophe in primary school.

Resource(s):               A comprehensive English Course Bk.3

Introduction:             Teacher presents to class a scenario about the ‘apostrophe’. Strike three! You're out!''

Do you like baseball? In baseball, many teams have a person called a utility player. This player isn't assigned to just one position but is skilled enough to play in different locations on the field. Utility players are a big help because a coach can put them wherever the team needs the most help.

Like utility players, apostrophes are used in different parts of the English language. An apostrophe is a type of punctuation mark that looks like a floating comma. Can you pick out the apostrophe in this picture?

Which one is the apostrophe?

If you said ''letter C,'' you're exactly right! Now that you know what apostrophes look like, let's learn about how to use them.

Procedure

Step one:        Teacher asks: Has your class ever had a substitute teacher? A substitute teacher is not your regular teacher, but he or she is doing the same job (and not taking the class up on its suggestion to have all-day recess).

An apostrophe is like a substitute teacher when it's used in a contraction. A contraction is where two words are combined together to make one. Certain letters are removed from the words and replaced by an apostrophe. The apostrophe becomes a substitute for the missing letters.

Here are some common contractions and what they mean:

Common contractions

There are a lot of them, and these aren't even all of them. Teacher provides examples to class. What contractions could you use in the following sentence? Have students come to the board to write the contraction and practice writing the apostrophe. Teacher assists pupils and discusses the use and how they are properly written.

  • At the toy store, do not forget that I am going to buy rubber chickens and you are going to buy itching powder.

If students’ corrections were: don'tI'm, and you're, then you're exactly right. The sentence with contractions should read:

  • At the toy store, don't forget that I'm going to buy rubber chickens and you're going to buy itching powder.

Step two:        Allow students to read the corrected sentences after correcting the sentences using the apostrophe.

Step Three:    Teacher poses a question: How is a contraction like a substitute teacher? Teacher gives each student an index card. Assign each partner pair a word/contraction pair and have them write on the index cards. For example, one student in the pair will write 'I am' on one index card while the other student will write 'I'm' on the other index card. Collect cards and redistribute to students, lying face down on desks. Tell students that on your go they should silently look for their partner and stand next to them when found. Give them a signal to use to show they're ready to be checked, such as raising their hand or giving a 'thumbs up. After all students have found their partner, have them read the index cards aloud to check with classmates. Collect cards and keep for later use as a memory game.

Application/Assessment:      Worksheets provided. Write the shortened form of the words. Identify the words that are incorrectly written and rewrite the passage using the correct punctuation form (‘)

Evaluation:

Resources

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LESSON PLAN-form3.docx

Lesson Plan
November 6, 2022
0.1 MB
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