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9 Reviews | 1123 Downloads

ELA MODULE 10.2.1 “LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL” BY MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. Part 2

Grade Level Grades 9-12, Higher Education
Resource Type Activity, Assessment, Handout, Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

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PPTX FORMATTED LESSON PLANS 

Students engage with King’s text as a persuasive essay, continuing to build skills for close reading and rhetorical analysis as well as developing their ability to identify and evaluate the claims an author uses in support of his argument. At the same time, students work to strengthen their analytical skills through written assessments and collaborative discussions in which they learn to articulate and support their ideas using textual evidence. By examining the text alongside three poems, students begin to consider how these different texts develop common central ideas about human rights.  

If you download the lessons, please leave a review.

Get more here: https://sharemylesson.com/teaching-resource/ela-module-10.2.1-%E2%80%9C…

 #7 Member Lesson of 2018

Standards

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

Reviews

5.0
9 Reviews
Thank you for the glowing review. I appreciate your taking time out of your busy season to write this. My principle pleasure is in the creature of the work; the penultimate is the sharing, but ultimately, knowing it has helped my fellow teachers and their students, is the greatest pleasure. Again, thank you for taking time to write a review.
IMKessel
December 06, 2020
Part 2 is just as exceptional as part 1. This is the kind of lesson that can be taught for an entire quarter maybe longer. This is just one small part of the life of Dr. King, yet we all can learn so much from his incarceration, especially our students who are looking to understand the struggle we're still having in regards to human rights. I thank you again for providing this amazing lesson. I, myself, have learned so much from reading both parts of this lesson.
Daniel Zendejas
December 06, 2020
Excited to see you make the top 2018 list, Ira!
Kelly Booz
December 13, 2018
Thank you for your kind words. I will be working on English III lessons this year.
IMKessel
August 14, 2018
This lesson is so amazing! I have really enjoyed how well this lesson is put together.
jodum94_2940981
August 12, 2018