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Antartica

August 1, 2022

Scientists Measure How Quickly Antarctica Glacier Is Melting

Ask Students: Who is the scientist from New York University (NYU) that went on the voyage? What is the rate that the Thwaites glacier is melting per year?

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Summary

Climate change’s connections with the extreme heat and weather events in the U.S. and around the globe have been well established. But climate change is also having a measurable impact on a much slower-moving development: the loss of glaciers and the melting of the ice. Miles O’Brien brings us this update on a scientist’s quest to chronicle what’s happening with one of the most important glaciers. For a transcript of this story, click here.

Remote video URL

Five Facts

  • Who is the scientist from New York University (NYU) that went on the voyage?
  • What is the rate that the Thwaites glacier is melting per year?
  • How much can the Thwaites glacier increase the global sea level if melted?
  • Which ice shelf did David Holland actually end up visiting?
  • Why did they decide to not go to the Thwaites glacier on the original expedition?

Focus Questions

Scientist David Holland ran into major problems in collecting his data. What were three of the problems that he ran into and how did he solve each of them? What can you take from this video to use in your own life?

Media Literacy: The video shows that Antarctic glaciers are melting because of climate change. How can videos like this one influence change? Why is it the responsibility of the media to publish videos that showcase problems in the world?

For More

Republished with permission from PBS NewsHour Classroom

Lesson Plans on Climate Change

Explore more resources for educators to find a wide-range of relevant preK-12 lessons on climate change or supporting young people as they continue to lead the conversation around the climate change crisis.

PBS NewsHour Classroom helps teachers and students identify the who, what, where and why-it-matters of the major national and international news stories.

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