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CCSS Lessons for The Genie's Gift, a middle grade historical fantasy

Grade Level Grades 3-5
Resource Type Activity
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards
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“Because this book presents realistic life in 15th C Arabia, it could easily fulfill CCSS needs to integrating literature into the Social Studies curriculum.” – Jennifer Bohnhoff, social studies teacher 

The Genie’s Gift is a lighthearted action novel set in the fifteenth-century Middle East, drawing on the mythology of The Arabian Nights. Shy and timid Anise determines to find the Genie Shakayak and claim the Gift of Sweet Speech. But the way is barred by a series of challenges, both ordinary and magical. How will Anise get past a vicious she-ghoul, a sorceress who turns people to stone, and mysterious sea monsters, when she can’t even speak in front of strangers?

“The kids in my class were sitting around in a reading circle and we had just finished the book. EXCITEMENT! After we read the next to last chapter, I waited ... they waited to see if they could finish … fingers were ready to turn the page ... it was so cool to watch. Then I said, ‘Raise your hand if you want to read the last chapter.’ Sixteen hands shot up in unison. You should have been there!” – Suzanne Borchers, elementary gifted teacher 

Standards

Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.
Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.
Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

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