Daily Activities Flashcards - English/ Polish

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12 Downloads 367 Views Updated: Thursday, July 14, 2016 - 6:43am
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A set of 58 colorful flashcards with daily activities such as: brushing teeth; washing face; playing a game; feeding a pet; using the toilet; wearing a school uniform; crossing the street; doing homework and many more. The flashcards might be used separately or with English – Polish captions.

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SML_Member
July 2016
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SML_Member
January 2016
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SML_Member
November 2011
These are lovely! Thank you for taking the time to make these- a girl in my class has been smilling all day!
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SML_Member
August 2010
Brilliant resource
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SML_Member
March 2009
Yes, I would say that Polish/ a,/ is a little bit like French or just /on/ or /om/ (depending on the next consonant - so in the word / tra,bka/ (trumpet) the pronunciation would be 'trompka' (b becomes voiceless p), because 'm' is labial (like 'b' and 'p', and in / tra,cac'/ (jostle, poke) it would be /trontsatch/, because 'n' is alveolar the same like 'ts'. <br/> e, is (roughly) pronounced as /en/ e.g. in /me,zny/ (courageous) it will be menzhnee. <br/>At the end of the word /sie,/, /ide,/(I'm going) it would be just 'e' (like in egg) /sh-e/ /ee-d-e/. <br/>Well, the explanation looks bizzare, but I hope it will help. <br/>Phew... :))) <br/>
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SML_Member
March 2009
And coming back to your example:/ ba,k/ will be indeed /bonk/, because k, which is velar, is still closer to alveolar n than to labial m <br/> <br/>Any more questions about Polish phonology? :-D
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SML_Member
March 2009
It's rather hard, because the verbs in Polish conjugate (the forms given are infinitives) so I would have to write up to 6 different forms for every verb, depending on the person (i.e. to eat / jesc would be: jem, jesz, je, jemy, jecie, jedza <br/> <br/>However, there are some tips (first Polish letter or diagraphs then kind of English equivalents) : <br/> <br/>cz = ch <br/>sz = sh <br/>dz = ds (like in roads) <br/>dz (d and z with a dot) = j <br/>z (z with a dot) = zh (visual) <br/>rz is the same like z (visual) <br/>y = short i <br/>l (crossed l) = w <br/>w = v <br/>there are no long vowels in Polish: <br/>a = u (but) <br/>e = e (red) <br/>i = i (tin) <br/>o = o (pop) <br/>u = oo (book) <br/>ó (o with a comma above) is the same like u (book) <br/>a (a with a comma) = ou <br/>e (e with a comma) = short e+w <br/>c = always ts <br/>k = k <br/> <br/>All the letters with a comma above them (except ó) - I just cannot describe them :) and they are to hard to pronounce anyhow for someone who doesn't know the language. They are 'softer' versions of the sounds indicated by the letters. <br/>
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SML_Member
October 2008
Loads of really useful phrases. A great help
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SML_Member
October 2008
Thank you very much for a GREAT resource. I will pass this on to all the teachers of my new Polish pupils.