Easter in France cards to cut up

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10 Ratings
121 Downloads 998 Views Updated: Thursday, July 14, 2016 - 6:43am
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Suitable for any level. Each person has a card with a question and answer on it. They have 2 mins to go round room and ask their question. If the other person knows the answer they can reply but if not they just say I don’t know and the answer is given. Once you have used your card you swap cards with the person you were talking to and move on to do the same again. At end collect in and test them. Allow 5 secs to find out after question given then select at random! Please see also EASTER QUIZ with cards.

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Activity

Reviews

SML_Member's picture SML_Member
July 2016
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
January 2016
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
April 2012
Brilliant - kids loved it. Followed it up with the big Quiz. Great end of term activity!
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2012
LOVE this - thank you so much!
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2012
Great idea. Thanks
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
April 2011
Perfect- what a fantastic idea.
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
April 2011
What a great idea! The beauty of it is that it can be adapted to any topic or level. Thank you for sharing with us! :-)
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2010
an enjoyable easy activity which requires next to no preparation
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2008
Very good interactive game for a fun approach to Easter. I will include some pictures to make it a little bit more pretty (I teach in a girls' school!)
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2008
Lovely - great way of disseminating the information - thank you!
20
April 2015
Event

Easter

Easter[nb 1] (Old English usually Ēastrun, -on, or -an; also Ēastru, -o; and Ēostre),[1] also called Pasch (derived, through Latin: Pascha and Greek Πάσχα Paskha, from Aramaic: פסחא‎, cognate to Hebrew: פֶּסַח‎ Pesaḥ)[nb 2][2][3][4][5] or Resurrection Sunday,[6][7] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by Romans at Calvary c. 30 AD.[8][9] It is the culmination of the Passion of Christ, preceded by Lent (or Great Lent), a forty-day period of fasting, prayer, and penance. The week before Easter is called Holy Week, and it contains the days of the Easter Triduum, including Maundy Thursday, commemorating the Maundy and Last Supper,[10][11] as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus.[12] In western Christianity, Eastertide, the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and lasts seven weeks, ending with the coming of the fiftieth day, Pentecost Sunday. In Orthodoxy, the season of Pascha begins on Pascha and ends with the coming of the fortieth day, the Feast of the Ascension. Easter and the holidays that are related to it are moveable feasts in that they do not fall on a fixed date in the Gregorian or Julian calendars which follow only the cycle of the sun; rather, its date is determined on a lunisolar calendar similar to the Hebrew calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established two rules, independence of the Jewish calendar and worldwide uniformity, which were the only rules for Easter explicitly laid down by the council. No details for the computation were specified; these were worked out in practice, a process that took centuries and generated a number of controversies. It has come to be the first Sunday after the full moon that occurs on or soonest after 21 March,[13] but calculations vary in East and West. Details of this complicated computation are found below in the section Date. Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In many languages, the words for "Easter" and "Passover" are identical or very similar.[14] Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, exclaiming the Paschal greeting, clipping the church,[15] and decorating Easter eggs, a symbol of the empty tomb.[16][17][18] The Easter lily, a symbol of the resurrection,[19][20] traditionally decorates the chancel area of churches on this day and for the rest of Eastertide.[21] Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include egg hunting, the Easter Bunny, and Easter parades.[22][23][24] There are also various traditional Easter foods that vary regionally.