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Education and Equality in the Courts

Grade Level Grades 6-8
Resource Type Activity, Assessment
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards, State-specific
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This lesson engages students in inquiry, using primary-source analysis of American public education as a result of the Mendez v. Westminster federal case (1947) and the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case (1954). First, students analyze primary sources on the history of public education in the United States. Then, they participate in a moot court based on the historic case of Plyler v. Doe (1982) on the rights of immigrant children to public education. Finally, they write a short essay on the nation's responsibility to provide equal access to public education.

All the materials you need are downloadable on this page.

This lesson is a product of Citizen U, a collaboration of the Barat Education Foundation, Constitutional Rights Foundation, and DePaul University College of Education; funded with a Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) grant awarded by the Library of Congress. Content created and featured in partnership with the TPS program does not indicate an endorsement by the Library of Congress.

Resources

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Lesson Plan Education Equality Courts.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
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Source Pack 1 Education Equality Courts.pdf

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February 13, 2020
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Source Pack 2 Education Equality Courts.pdf

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February 13, 2020
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Handout A Education Equality Courts.pdf

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February 13, 2020
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Handout B Education Equality Courts.pdf

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February 13, 2020
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Handout C Education Equality Courts.pdf

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February 13, 2020
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Handout D Education Equality Courts.pdf

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February 13, 2020
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Handout E Education Equality Courts.pdf

Assessment
February 13, 2020
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Slide Pack 2 Discussion Questions Education Equality Courts.pptx

Activity
February 10, 2020
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Standards

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas.
Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented.
Students frame questions that can be answered by historical study and research.
Students distinguish fact from opinion in historical narratives and stories.
Students detect the different historical points of view on historical events and determine the context in which the historical statements were made (the questions asked, sources used, author’s perspectives).
Determine the value of sources by evaluating their relevance and intended use.
Construct arguments using claims and evidence from multiple sources, while acknowledging their strengths and limitations.
Identify evidence from multiple sources to support claims, noting its limitations.
Identify roles played by citizens (examples: voters, jurors, taxpayers, military, protesters, and office-holders).
Compare the means by which individuals and groups change societies, promote the common good, and protect rights.
Determine whether specific rules and laws (both actual and proposed) resolve the problems they were meant to address.
Analyze multiple factors that influenced the perspectives of people during different historical eras.
Explain multiple causes and effects of historical events.

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