Eggstraordinary Eggs

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13 Ratings
67 Downloads 740 Views Updated: Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - 3:26pm
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Eggstraordinary Eggs

What hatches from an egg? Does a chick? Or a lamb? Or a rabbit? Or a frog? And what about a spider? A ladybird? A fish? An alligator? Or even a snake?

Lesson Plan Resources

Reviews

SML_Member's picture SML_Member
July 2016
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
January 2016
March 2013
Thank you! The children will love this.
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2012
This is a great followup to the story "Chickens aren't the only ones" by Ruth Heller that we always read during this time. Great images!
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2012
Ansolutely love this!!!
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
April 2011
This is a wonderful presentation. My pupils in Germany just loved it! Regina
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
April 2011
very nice- children in Spain loved this
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
April 2011
This is lovely, the Easter story power point followed by this light hearted but thought provoking egg hatching power point is going tointroduce a nicely balanced lesson. Thanks.
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
April 2011
Fantastic - I smiled all the way through, young children would love the guessing game and the hmour within it!
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2011
Ab fab !! Thanks!!!
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2011
Thank you for sharing this wonderful powerpoint presentation! I will be showing it to my K2 students this Easter! Wonderful show!
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2011
Thanks for this - it will be perfect for my Pre-K class. I look forward to using it next week.
SML_Member's picture SML_Member
March 2011
thanks for sharing
20
April 2015
Event

Easter

Easter[nb 1] (Old English usually Ēastrun, -on, or -an; also Ēastru, -o; and Ēostre),[1] also called Pasch (derived, through Latin: Pascha and Greek Πάσχα Paskha, from Aramaic: פסחא‎, cognate to Hebrew: פֶּסַח‎ Pesaḥ)[nb 2][2][3][4][5] or Resurrection Sunday,[6][7] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by Romans at Calvary c. 30 AD.[8][9] It is the culmination of the Passion of Christ, preceded by Lent (or Great Lent), a forty-day period of fasting, prayer, and penance. The week before Easter is called Holy Week, and it contains the days of the Easter Triduum, including Maundy Thursday, commemorating the Maundy and Last Supper,[10][11] as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus.[12] In western Christianity, Eastertide, the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and lasts seven weeks, ending with the coming of the fiftieth day, Pentecost Sunday. In Orthodoxy, the season of Pascha begins on Pascha and ends with the coming of the fortieth day, the Feast of the Ascension. Easter and the holidays that are related to it are moveable feasts in that they do not fall on a fixed date in the Gregorian or Julian calendars which follow only the cycle of the sun; rather, its date is determined on a lunisolar calendar similar to the Hebrew calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established two rules, independence of the Jewish calendar and worldwide uniformity, which were the only rules for Easter explicitly laid down by the council. No details for the computation were specified; these were worked out in practice, a process that took centuries and generated a number of controversies. It has come to be the first Sunday after the full moon that occurs on or soonest after 21 March,[13] but calculations vary in East and West. Details of this complicated computation are found below in the section Date. Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In many languages, the words for "Easter" and "Passover" are identical or very similar.[14] Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, exclaiming the Paschal greeting, clipping the church,[15] and decorating Easter eggs, a symbol of the empty tomb.[16][17][18] The Easter lily, a symbol of the resurrection,[19][20] traditionally decorates the chancel area of churches on this day and for the rest of Eastertide.[21] Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include egg hunting, the Easter Bunny, and Easter parades.[22][23][24] There are also various traditional Easter foods that vary regionally.