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Hey, That's My Monster! read by Lily Tomlin
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Hey, That's My Monster! read by Lily Tomlin

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Grade Level Grades K-2
Resource Type Activity
Attributes
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

About This Lesson

When Ethan looks under the bed for his monster, he finds this note instead: “So long, kid. Gotta go. Someone needs me more than you do. –Gabe” How will Ethan ever get to sleep without his monster’s familiar, comforting snorts? And who could need Gabe more than Ethan does? Gabe must have gone to Ethan’s little sister’s room! She has been climbing out of bed every night to play, and obviously needs a monster to help her get to sleep – but not HIS monster! Ethan tries to help his sister find her own monster, but none are the perfect blend of cute and creepy. Just when it seems that Ethan will lose his monster forever, an uninvited, tutu-toting little monster full of frightening fun appears.

Storyline Online's Hey, That's My Monster! is read by Lily Tomlin, written by Amanda Noll and illustrated by Howard McWilliam.

Resources

Files

HeyThatsMyMonster_TeachersGuide.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
788.01 KB

HeyThatsMyMonster_FamilyActivityGuide.pdf

Activity
October 1, 2020
1009.68 KB
Videos
Hey That's My Monster read by Lily Tomlin
Remote video URL

Standards

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.
Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.
Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general action (e.g., walk, march, strut, prance) by acting out the meanings.
Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner (e.g., look, peek, glance, stare, glare, scowl) and adjectives differing in intensity (e.g., large, gigantic) by defining or choosing them or by acting out the meanings.
Distinguish shades of meaning among closely related verbs (e.g., toss, throw, hurl) and closely related adjectives (e.g., thin, slender, skinny, scrawny).
Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.
Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

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