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High School Unit Plan for Brave New World

Grade Level Grades 9-12
Resource Type Activity
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards
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In this unit on Brave New World, students will be able to articulate and write about how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3). Students will consider the essential question “Can there ever be such a thing as a ‘perfect society’? Students will show they have learned how to analyze the author’s choices by participating in a Socratic Seminar where they respond to and discuss questions that ask about the novel’s structure and themes. They will then write a culminating essay that demonstrates their ability to analyze these ideas in writing.

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Brave New World Unit Plan .pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.6 MB
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Standards

Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.
Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

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