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5.0 (2 Reviews)

Introduction to the Holocaust: Documentary Film and Classroom Materials

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Grade Level Grades 6-12
Resource Type Handout, Lesson Plan
Attributes
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards, State-specific

About This Lesson

Organized around a Museum-produced 38-minute documentary, The Path to Nazi Genocide, these materials and discussion questions provide students with an introduction to the history of the Holocaust. The film examines the Nazis’ rise and consolidation of power in Germany, as well as their racist ideology, propaganda, and persecution of Jews and other innocent civilians. It also outlines the path by which the Nazis led a state to war and, with their collaborators, killed millions -- including systematically murdering six million Jewish people. By providing a concise overview of the Holocaust and what made it possible, this resource is intended to provoke reflection and discussion about the role of ordinary people, institutions, and nations between 1918 and 1945.

Resources

Files

Path To Nazi Genocide Transcript.pdf

Handout, Worksheet
February 13, 2020
186.83 KB

Path To Nazi Genocide Important Events.pdf

Handout, Worksheet
February 13, 2020
135.3 KB

Introduction to the Holocaust.pdf

Lesson Plan
February 13, 2020
167.61 KB
Videos
The Path to Nazi Genocide
Remote video URL

Standards

Analyze the Nazi policy of pursuing racial purity, especially against the European Jews; its transformation into the Final Solution; and the Holocaust that resulted in the murder of six million Jewish civilians.
Students will investigate and analyze the historical context of the Holocaust, Nuremberg Trials, and Tokyo Trials and their impact on the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
The crime of genocide crosses cultures and eras. Jews and other groups experienced devastation at the hands of Nazi Germany.
Students will investigate the Holocaust and explain the historical significance of the Nuremberg trials.
Students will examine the atrocities against the Armenians; examine the Ukrainian Holodomor, and examine the Holocaust.
The Nazi Holocaust: the extermination of Jews, Poles, other Slavs, Gypsies, disabled, and others
The Nazi Holocaust: United States and world reactions
analyze major issues of World War II, including the Holocaust; the internment of German, Italian, and Japanese Americans and Executive Order 9066; and the development of conventional and atomic weapons;
analyze major issues of World War II, including the Holocaust; the internment of German, Italian, and Japanese Americans and Executive Order 9066; and the development of conventional and atomic weapons;
explain the major causes and events of World War II, including the German invasions of Poland and the Soviet Union, the Holocaust, Japanese imperialism, the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Normandy landings, and the dropping of the atomic bombs.
explain the major causes and events of World War II, including the German invasions of Poland and the Soviet Union, the Holocaust, Japanese imperialism, the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Normandy landings, and the dropping of the atomic bombs.
identify examples of genocide, including the Holocaust and genocide in the Balkans, Rwanda, and Darfur;
identify examples of genocide, including the Holocaust and genocide in the Balkans, Rwanda, and Darfur; and
Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.
Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.
Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
5.0
2 Reviews
We couldn't agree more, Michael! And that's why most of the remarkable institutions you mention have shared some of their high-quality resources on Share My Lesson for free.
Susan Youssofi
December 10, 2019
USHMM creates and shares excellent Holocaust Education resources, along with Echoes and Reflections, iWitness, and 'Facing History and Ourselves."
Michael Polgar PhD
December 09, 2019
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