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The Life of Environments

Grade Level Grades 3-5
Resource Type Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Next Generation Science Standards, State-specific
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A hand-illustrated 4th grade cross-curricular​ science, math, and language unit that teaches wondering, meta-cognition, and compassion.

Please give us feedback, and visit www.mindmyeducation.com to see our critical thinking and self-assessment tools for the elementary classroom. 

Standards

Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table.
Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.
By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. Recognize and begin to read documents written in cursive.
By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. Continue to develop fluency when reading documents written in cursive.
Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, (e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers.
Explain why a fraction ?/? is equivalent to a fraction (? × ?)/(? × ?) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.
Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100.
Understand a fraction 1/? as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into ? equal parts; understand a fraction ?/? as the quantity formed by ? parts of size 1/?.
Represent a fraction 1/? on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into ? equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/? and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/? on the number line.
Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole.
Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators, e.g., by replacing each mixed number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by using properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.
Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison.
Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.
Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole and having like denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.
Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers.
Convert among different-sized standard measurement units within a given measurement system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05 m), and use these conversions in solving multi-step, real world problems.
Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.
Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots.
Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Use operations on fractions for this grade to solve problems involving information presented in line plots.
Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).
By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).
Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. Recognize and begin to read documents written in cursive.
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.
Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.
Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.
Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., describe people who are friendly or helpful).
Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.
Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.
Construct an explanation to describe how animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brains, and respond to the information in different ways.
Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.
Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
Develop a model to describe that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen.

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