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Organized Labor and the American Dream

Grade Level Grades 9-12
Resource Type Activity, Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards, State-specific

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Main idea of this organized labor lesson: The story of power, justice, and opportunity is complicated. It is not one of constant or linear progression and expansion, as young people often think.

Time to complete: 2 – 3 class periods

Students read and watch several source documents and then have a rich class discussion on the following questions: 

  • How have power and justice played out over American history?
  • How are fair pay and working conditions related to freedom?
  • What is the role of government in promoting fairness in economic opportunity?
  • Should we be concerned about an ever-widening gap between the extremely wealthy and the working class? Does this strengthen or threaten the American dream?

Like this lesson on organized labor?

Check out more free resources on Share My Lesson in the collection, Labor Day: Union Education Resources.

Resources

Files

Labor and American Dream.docx

Lesson Plan
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Socratic Seminar Instructions.docx

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Standards

engage others in a conversation by posing and responding to questions in a group situation.
analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
Use a variety of listening strategies to analyze relationships among purpose, audience, and content of presentations.
African Americans, working through the court system and mass protest, reshaped public opinion and secured the passage of civil rights.
What are the roles that government plays in the United States economy?
The government can intervene in labor-management relations and can regulate competition in the marketplace
The United States government creates laws and agencies to regulate production and exchange activities, conduct research, and establish guidelines for consumer rights and safety. The government can also intervene in labor-management relations and can regulate competition in the marketplace.
What is the government’s role in labor-management relations?
Labor (e.g., Occupational Safety and Health Administration)
Use information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person’s life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g., force, friction, reaction force, energy).
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.
Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

Reviews

5.0
1 Review
Another excellent resource from Julie Stern. If you're not following her on SML - you should!
Kelly Booz
December 13, 2018