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Romeow & Drooliet read by Haylie Duff

Grade Level Grades 2-4
Resource Type Activity
Attributes
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

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Romeow the cat and Drooliet the dog are two star-crossed lovers who met by chance, marry in secret, and are kept apart by a snarling rottweiler, appalled owners, and the animal control warden.

Storyline Online's Romeow & Drooliet is read by Haylie Duff, and is written and illustrated by Nina Laden.

Resources

Files

RomeowandDrooliet_TeacherActivityGuide.pdf

Activity
October 1, 2020
0.7 MB
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Videos
Romeow & Drooliet read by Haylie Duff
Remote video URL

Standards

Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.
Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.

Reviews

1 Review
Very cute story. Students would enjoy hearing stories from tv stars they know. The activity resource also has some nice ways to use this video in the classroom. Thanks for sharing.
birdheim
September 20, 2014