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Social Justice and Human Rights: Sharing Esther's Story

Grade Level Grades 6-12
Resource Type Activity
Attributes
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

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Esther Krinitz’s story is an excellent springboard for students to start thinking about human rights, social justice and the various ways their knowledge, voice and actions can impact the lives of others. World War II was a catalyst for international human rights support as well as for the Civil Rights movement in the United States.  The following lessons and suggested activities can be incorporated into existing programs or can help your students start or get involved in something meaningful in your community.  

By learning about universal human rights, students will make connections between their rights and their responsibilities to uphold these rights.  They will have a better understanding about the underlying principles of freedom, equality, fairness and justice and how there is much still to be done around the world to make sure that stories like Esther’s don’t happen again.

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Social_Justice_and_Human_Rights.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.3 MB
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Standards

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

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