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The Story-Teller by H.H Munro
lesson
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4.6 (10 Reviews)

The Story-Teller by H.H Munro

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About This Lesson

The story opens on a hot summer day with three small children and their aunt sitting in a railway carriage on the way to Templecombe. Together with them in the carriage is an unknown man who observes their behavior. The children are bored and ask their aunt various questions. She tells them to observe the surroundings, but that encourages even more curiosity. In order to keep the children quiet for a while, the aunt decides to tell them a story. She comes up with a conventional, moralistic tale which fails to capture the interest of the children and creates even bigger discontent. As he also heard the story, the unknown man decides to point out its flaws. The aunt takes it as an offense and challenges him to tell a better story.

Resources

Files

Brigit Jose 1731810 - 2.docx

Activity
February 13, 2020
28.38 KB
Videos
The Story Teller by Saki
Remote video URL

Standards

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression.
Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.
4.6
10 Reviews
I like this lesson. If I could suggest, though, please make grade level clear. You list it as IX, which is not universal. This is a great lesson.
lhuntley_1776409
October 25, 2018
Brigit this is great and I'm happy to see that young teachers are so talented these days ?
Rashi Shrivastava
January 03, 2018
dear Brigit You have put all your effort for this job !!
vijigrace84_2832474
January 02, 2018
Excellent work
Paul Raj
January 02, 2018
Well done
manwesha2110_2834288
January 01, 2018
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