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Teach Active Citizenship with We The People: A Civics Remix

  • We The People Image
  • Preview of WeThePeople_Kit.pdf - page 1
Subject Arts — Music, English Language Arts, Social Studies — Civics and Government, US History
Grade Level Grades 6-8
Resource Type Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
NGA Center/CCSSO, National Council for the Social Studies
License

Attribution Non-commercial NoDerivative

CC (BY-NC-ND)

Description
Resources
Standards
Reviews

Help your students become active citizens in their community and empower them to make changes they are passionate about with We The People.

 

This program includes:

  • Teacher's Guide
  • Lessons that help enhance students' understanding of civics
  • Engaging student activities that encourage students to use their voices.

 

Visit the PROGRAM SITE for:

  • Complete teaching kit
  • Curricular standards alignment
  • Links to two full episodes of We The People

Made Possible By: Netflix

Resources

Files
Lesson Plan
October 20, 2021
17.9 MB
Links
Website

Standards

Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).
Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media in a variety of governmental and nongovernmental contexts.
Explain specific roles played by citizens (such as voters, jurors, taxpayers, members of the armed forces, petitioners, protesters, and office-holders).
Examine the origins, purposes, and impact of constitutions, laws, treaties, and international agreements.
Explain the powers and limits of the three branches of government, public officials, and bureaucracies at different levels in the United States and in other countries.
Explain the origins, functions, and structure of government with reference to the U.S. Constitution, state constitutions, and selected other systems of government.
Describe the roles of political, civil, and economic organizations in shaping people’s lives.
Apply civic virtues and democratic principles in school and community settings.
Analyze ideas and principles contained in the founding documents of the United States, and explain how they influence the social and political system.
Compare deliberative processes used by a wide variety of groups in various settings.
Explain the relevance of personal interests and perspectives, civic virtues, and democratic principles when people address issues and problems in government and civil society.
Differentiate among procedures for making decisions in the classroom, school, civil society, and local, state, and national government in terms of how civic purposes are intended.
Assess specific rules and laws (both actual and proposed) as means of addressing public problems.
Analyze the purposes, implementation, and consequences of public policies in multiple settings.

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