What's happening to the bees?

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What's happening to the bees?

Project Title: What’s happening to the bees?

Project Idea: The students will begin to research bees to determine what is happening to the bee population and brainstorm ways on how to save them from dying off.

Investigation, What is happening to all of the bees?

Entry Event:to launch inquiry and spark curiosity.

Content Standards & Objectives: 

 

 The students will be able:

  • Ask and answer who, what, where, when, why, how questions to determine key details of the text. 
  • Describe the connections between historical events, scientific ideas, and technical steps in a text.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts that include a topic, use facts or definitions to develop a point, and provide a concluding statement. 
  • Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse peers and adults in small and large groups. 

Objectives Directly Taught or Learned Through Discovery

Identified Learning Targets

Evidence of Success in Achieving Identified Learning Target

Ask and Answer questions to determine key details of the text

Students will provide in text evidence when asking and answering questions. 

 

Students will show answer highlighted in text and will provide correct answer according to the text being provided. 

 

 

21st Century Skills

Learning Skills &

Technology Tools

Teaching Strategies 

 

Evidence of Success

Information and 

Communication

Research based inquiry

Students will be taught the difference between reliable vs. unreliable resources. 

Students are logging into websites that are reliable such as .org or .gov 

Thinking and Reasoning Skills

Students will be able to come up with own ideas on how to save bees and why it is important to do so. 

Students will be able to speak to a beekeeper to determine the importance of bees. 

Students are collaborating and discussing various methods that can be used to save the bees. 

Personal and Workplace Skills

Students are working collaboratively and are being respectful towards one another.

Teaching students how to work respectfully and speak collaboratively with one another.

Positive conversations and showing interest in different ideas. 

 

 

Performance Objectives:  What must all students knowand be able to doas a result of this PBL experience?

 

Know: Students must know what bees are, what jobs are done in the hive, and how they contribute to the food making process. 

 

Do: Students should be able to have a basic knowledge of writing skills, ability to use a computer, and work collaboratively with one another. 

 

 

Driving Question:  What is happening to the bees? What can we do to save the bees so they don’t go extinct?

 

Assessment Plan:  

 

Each child will be responsible for creating an essay on their job and explaining how their contributions are important for the hive. 

 

 

The students will be given the opportunity to present their poster, as a group, to the class and will explicitly state why it is important to save the bees and how to save them. 

 

Students can give examples such as: 

Raise money, plant more flowers, make videos to spread awareness, etc. 

 

 

 

Major Group Products

 

Poster boards on how to save the bees

 

Major Individual Projects

 

Essay on individual bee job and how it contributes to their hive. 

 

Assessment and Reflection:

 

Rubric(s) I will use: (Check all that apply.)

Collaboration

o

Written Communication

o

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

o

Content Knowledge

 

Oral Communication

o

Other

 

Other classroom assessments for learning: (Check all that apply)

Quizzes/ tests

 

Practice presentations

o

Self-evaluation

 

Notes

 

Peer evaluation

 

Checklists/observations

 

Online tests and exams

 

Concept maps

 

Reflections:     (Check all that apply)

Survey

 

Focus Group

 

Discussion

o

Task Management Chart

 

Journal Writing/ Learning Log

 

Other

 

 

Map the Project: Students will be given a mini-lesson in each of the requirements. The teacher will go over the writing process and what the expectations are for each assessment to be successful.

 

 

 

Resources: 

             

 

Technology: Websites to provide information about bees and their importance. 

 

Community: Beekeeper will be coming in to discuss the importance of bees and to discuss the variety of bees and will show examples of beeswax and honey. 

 

Materials:  

 

Poster board

Computers, Ipads, Laptops, etc. (for research)

Articles

Craft materials to decorate boards (markers, crayons, pompoms, buttons, pictures from magazines, craft sticks, etc. 

Anchor chart paper

Writing paper

 

Activities

 

The students will perform various activities such as:

 

  • Fill in a KWL chart at the beginning of unit
  • Determine what groups they will be in (interview process, to determine what type of bee’s job they want to have and what bee population). 
  • Read and research about their job and bee population
  • Read about what is happening to bees and determine the meaning of unknown words in the text.  
  • Create a poster about their bee population and how to save the bees, as well as, stating why it is important to save the bee populations. 

 

 

Vocabulary Words:

 

Vanishing

Pollinate

Colony Collapse Disorder

Hive 

Endangered

 

Day 1:

 

**In order for students to begin to understand the importance of bees and why it is important to save them, they would need to understand the different types of bees and the way each bee contributes to their hive in a variety of ways.**

 

 

The teacher will activate prior knowledge and will ask the students “What they think is happening to the bee populations?” “Why is it important to save the bees?” The students, alongside the teacher, will brainstorm to enter the ‘K’ portion on their KWL chart (what they already know about this topic). Then the students will turn and talk to discuss what they want to know about this topic (W portion of the KWL chart). The students will be given the information of the bee populations to further research, as well as, potential bee jobs that they would want to have during this project. The students will be given the information to interview each other to determine what jobs are needed during each group (workers, builders, guard, nurse, foragers). Each student will interview for their desired position and placed in a group with classmates that have different jobs. There may only be 3 or 4 groups depending on the class. The teacher will discuss the various types of bees (Honey bees, killer bees, bumble bees, mason bees, leafcutter bees, etc.).

 

Once that takes place, each group will have one of each worker and will learn about his or her type of bee. If time permits, students can begin research on their job.

 

The teacher will walk around to ask specific questions and to assist in researching their topic. 

 

Day 2:

 

The teacher will discuss what information was found on their topic and will provide each student with an article called What is happening to the bees?

 

Students will answer questions such as:

 

Why are scientists scared?

What is CCD or Colony Collapse Disorder?

What do you think is happening to the bees?

What do scientists think is happening to the bees?

 

Students will work in groups and provide the answers to the questions above. Referring back to the text for answers.  Then, students will have discussions with the teacher about their findings. 

 

Day 3:

 

The teacher will discuss what information was found on their topic and will provide each student with an article called Why are bees important?

 

Students will answer questions such as:

 

Determine what pollinator and avoid means in the text.

What types of plants do bees pollinate? Give an example. 

What happens when bees pollinate flowers?

 

Students will work in groups and provide the answers to the questions above. Then, students will have discussions with the teacher about their findings. 

 

Day 4:

 

Mini-Lesson- Writing process (topic sentence)

 

The students will have time to research more about their specific type of bee and the specific job they do to contribute to their hive (using laptops, Ipads, computers, etc.)

 

Students will begin collaborating with teammates with their findings and discuss how their job contributes to the hive and why their job is important. 

 

Students will begin writing an informative essay on this topic. 

 

 

 

Day 5:

 

Mini-Lesson-Continuing the writing process

 

The students will be given the time to continue working on their essay and continue to do more research on their specific job and how they contribute to the hive (if more information is needed). 

 

The teacher will continue to walk around and assist the students with the writing process.

 

 

 

Day 6:

 

Mini-Lesson-Continuing the writing process

 

The students will be given the time to continue working on their essay and continue to do more research on their specific job and how they contribute to the hive (if more information is needed). 

 

The teacher will continue to walk around and assist the students with the writing process.

 

Day 8:

 

The teacher will brainstorm with the students to determine why it is important to save the bees and how to save them. 

 

The students will finish essay and begin researching how to save the bees and why it is important to save the bees. 

 

Students will begin designing their poster (using Poster board, markers, crayons, craft sticks, and any other creative materials available). 

 

Day 9:

 

Guest speaker will come in and students can ask a local beekeeper what they can do to save the bees and why it is important to do so. 

 

After listening to guest speaker, students will be given the opportunity to continue to work on their poster. Teacher will be walking around to ensure students understand why bees are important and why it is imperative to save them. Teacher can assist in answering any questions that the students may have. Teacher can also pull small groups to ensure understanding and assist where necessary. 

 

Day 10:

 

Students and teacher will fill in final portion of KWL chart, everything that was learned and discuss the things we can do to save the bees and why it is important to do so. 

Students will continue to work on poster designs with their groups. 

 

Day 11-12:

 

Students will present their posters to the class. 

 

Adaptations: 

 

Students can be given visual cues to aid in word meaning. Students can be given peer helpers, or pulled to work in small group with the teacher, dictate accordingly (if the child speaks another language), translate (if possible), and provide extra time. 

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