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Big Brother is Watching You
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5.0 (3 Reviews)

Big Brother is Watching You

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Grade Level Grades 9-12
Resource Type Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards
License

About This Lesson

This is lesson 13 out of 16 lessons in a twelfth grade AP Literature unit. It uses many different text types - visual, non-fiction and fiction, all related to the central literary text "1984" by George Orwell. Aligned to Common Core State Standards: RL.11-12.1, RL.11-12.3, RL.11-12.5, RI.11-12.1, RI.11-12.3. RI.11-12.5, W.11-12.1, W.11-12.2, SL.11-12.1, SL.11-12.2

Resources

Files

12_English_Silveri_1_Big_Brother.docx

Lesson Plan
February 13, 2020
33.61 KB
Legacy Embed

Standards

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
5.0
3 Reviews
LJust wondering if you could upload or add links to the sources the students were working with?
JeanHay
April 14, 2015
This is a well developed lesson that integrates several aspects of CCSS.
katpham
December 14, 2013
The "Big Brother" questions for students are especially good and could be used in other context.
Amber Rain Chandler
December 08, 2013
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