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Dragon Comprehends Key Ideas & Details

Grade Level Grades K-3
Resource Type Handout
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards, State-specific

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Reading Comprehension lesson plan student level: K to 3rd grade elementary

Reading Comprehension lesson plan materials required:

Reading Comprehension lesson plan activity time: 1 to 3 class periods, depending on use of optional activities.

Objective of Reading Comprehension lesson plan: Help teachers achieve reading literature common core standards on key ideas and details by practicing reading comprehension skills.

Preparation for Reading Comprehension lesson plan: Make enough copies of the Reading Comprehension Forms/Handouts for each student.

Reading Comprehension of Plot
Read the picture book Old MacDonald had a Dragon to the whole class. After reading the book, discuss with the class the problems that the farmer faced in the story. What problem did he have in the beginning of the book? What choices did he have? Did he remain happy with his choice? How did the problem get worse? How did he finally resolve the problem? Ask the students in the class if they liked the farmer’s resolution to the problem. If desired, ask the students how they would have resolved the problem.

Discuss how most traditional stories follow a similar predictable pattern. The main character faces a problem that he or she must resolve, and often the problem gets worse until the main character ultimately resolves the problem. Ask the students if they can think of examples of other stories that they’ve read or heard that follows this pattern. If desired, you can put the students in groups or team them up with partners to talk about and think of examples of other stories. After a few minutes, bring them back together to discuss their ideas or present your own story examples. Examples of stories might include the following:

  • Jack and the Beanstalk: Jack’s family is poor. He trades cow for magic beans. Mom gets mad and throws beans away. Jack climbs beanstalk and steals giant’s treasure. Giant tries to eat Jack. Jack chops down beanstalk.
  • The Three Pigs: Wolf wants to eat pigs. Pigs build houses. Wolf blows down straw and stick houses (in some versions eats the pigs). Pig in the brick house is safe until wolf goes down chimney. Pig cooks wolf in big pot of water.

Have the students answer the questions in the story comprehension forms to practice their story comprehension abilities and assess their comprehension.

Reading Comprehension of Characters:
Who are the main characters of the story? Ask and discus with the students what are some of the things they know about the main characters. Have the students answer the questions in the character comprehension forms to practice their character comprehension abilities and assess their comprehension.

Reading Comprehension of Setting:
Discuss the setting for Old MacDonald had a dragon. Ask the students the types of things that are usually found on a farm. Discuss the different types of farms (i.e., farms with different animals, dairy farms, farms that only grow crops, farms that have animals and crops, etc.). Talk about how the use of adjectives helps readers better visualize the setting in a story. Have the students answer questions in the setting comprehension form to practice their setting comprehension abilities and assess their comprehension, as well as to experiment with descriptive language to describe a setting of their choice.

Optional Reading Comprehension Activity: Think-Aloud Reading Comprehension Skill Development:
Think-aloud strategies can help student’s comprehension on tests. By verbalizing their thoughts with a think-aloud process students have to occasionally stop and reflect upon what they’re reading or hearing, which ultimately helps them develop their comprehension skills.

To conduct this think-aloud activity, the first time you read Old MacDonald had a Dragon to the students, do not show them the pictures on each page of the book until you have 1) Read the text on the page, 2) Asked the students the questions listed below associated with the pages indicated, and 3) The students have had a chance to respond out loud to the questions.

  • Page w/ farmer singing on porch - What do you think the farmer looks like? Does the cow sound happy, sad, or mad?
  • Page that first shows the dragon – What do you picture the dragon doing on this page?
  • Page showing the pig leaving – How do you think the pig is planning to leave?
  • Page w/ farmer singing about the dog – What do you picture the dog doing?
  • Page singing moo-oink-baa-woof – What do you picture the farmer and animals doing?

Additional Optional Reading Comprehension and Writing Activities

Alternative Ending: Have the students think of their own alternative ending for the story and ask them to write that ending.

Imaginative Writing: Ask the students to write about the problems and/or good things that would happen if they had a dragon at their house.

More on Adjectives: Discuss some the “descriptive” language used in the story by the dragon and have the students write sentences using some of those adjectives or adjectives of your choice. (Delightful Dairy/Savory Swine/Marvelous Mutton/Terrible Tummy Ache). This could also be an opportunity to discuss alliteration.

Story Comparison: Read to the class the picture book Cow Can’t Sleep by Ken Baker. Ask about and discuss with the class the similarities between this book and Old MacDonald had a Dragon (i.e., It’s on a farm, animals, farmer, etc.). Discuss and ask about how they’re different. (i.e., different plot, no dragon, daytime vs nighttime, etc.)

Resources

Files

reading-comprehension-lesson-plan-handouts.pdf

Handout, Worksheet
November 2, 2023
0.1 MB
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Standards

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because).
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.
Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
Distinguish the literal and nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in context (e.g., take steps).
Distinguish shades of meaning among related words that describe states of mind or degrees of certainty (e.g., knew, believed, suspected, heard, wondered).
Recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., first word, capitalization, ending punctuation).
Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
determining the meaning of the author’s use of similes and metaphors to produce imagery
Identify and explain similes, idioms, and alliteration in text(s).
Identify and explain how the author uses idioms, metaphor, or personification to shape meaning and style.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language, including but not limited to idioms and hyperboles, and describe how those words and phrases shape meaning.
Apply an understanding of the relationship between text features, specifically illustrations, and the characters, setting, and mood of a story.
compare and contrast adventures and experiences of characters in stories
Answer “who” or “what” the story is about.
Answer “who” or “what” the story is about.
Identify elements of fiction (e.g., characters, setting, plot, problem, solution) and elements of poetry (e.g., rhyme, rhythm, figurative language, alliteration, onomatopoeia).
Communicate ideas and information in a clear and concise manner suited to the purpose, setting, and audience (formal voice or informal voice), using appropriate word choice, grammar, and sentence structure.
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.
Explain the relationship between events in different parts of a literary text (e.g., cause/effect, problem/solution).
Answer literal, inferential, and critical/application questions after listening to or reading imaginative and informational texts
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
understand that word meanings can be comprehended through context, discussion, connections to familiar words, and knowledge of vocabulary from other content areas.
Demonstrate fluent reading in order to fully comprehend text by responding accurately (e.g., discussion, written response).
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Use sentence-level context (synonym, antonym, definition, examples) to comprehend the meaning of a word or phrase.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
understand that word meanings can be comprehended through context, discussion, connections to familiar words, and knowledge of vocabulary from other content areas

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