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Guided Reading Questions for The Nocturnals: The Mysterious Abductions

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Grade Level Grades 3-5
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

About This Lesson

Utilize this free educator's guide to lead a discussion about The Nocturnals: The Mysterious Abductions. Engage your classroom in the nighttime adventure with this 5 page guide. The sections/ activities include a pre-reading activity, classroom discussion questions, cirriculum connections (with activity sheet) and a vocabulary/use of language section. You can use the guide as a whole or pick and choose which sections you would like. Each section is labeled with the Common Core Standards that apply to that set of questions.

In The Mysterious Abductions, the fi rst novel in the series, Dawn, a serious fox, Tobin, a sweet pangolin and Bismark, the loud mouthed, pint sized sugar glider are nocturnal friends that form a brigade to protect themselves from a blood-thirsty snake. When animals begin disappearing without a trace, the brigade realizes that their night realm is threatened. Together with the help of a wombat, a band of coyotes and many other Nocturnals, Dawn, Tobin and Bismark journey to the depths of the earth in a wacky, high stakes game that determines their survival.

For more, visit www.nocturnalsworld.com

Resources

Files

Nocturnals_TG_color.pdf

February 13, 2020
2.31 MB

Standards

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.
Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.
Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.
Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

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