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Library Lion read by Mindy Sterling
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Library Lion read by Mindy Sterling

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Grade Level Grades K-3
Resource Type Activity
Attributes
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

About This Lesson

Miss Merriweather, the head librarian, is very particular about rules in the library. No running allowed. And you must be quiet. But when a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There aren't any rules about lions in the library. And, as it turns out, this lion seems very well suited to library visiting. His big feet are quiet on the library floor. He makes a comfy backrest for the children at story hour. And he never roars in the library, at least not anymore. But when something terrible happens, the lion quickly comes to the rescue in the only way he knows how.

Storyline Online's Library Lion is read by Mindy Sterling, written by Michelle Knudsen and illustrated by Kevin Hawkes.

Resources

Files

LibraryLion_TeacherActivityGuide.pdf

Activity
October 1, 2020
1.21 MB
Videos
Library Lion read by Mindy Sterling
Remote video URL

Standards

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.
Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.
A very entertaining reading of a cute story. Students would enjoy listening to this story. I wish there was a lesson plan included with activities, vocabulary and questions to go along with it. Thanks for sharing.
birdheim
September 20, 2014
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