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Mandela: Hero or Villain?

Grade Level Grades 9-12
Resource Type Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards
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Is a person who runs afoul of the law in the fight for freedom to be considered a hero, a criminal, both or neither? History is full of examples of individuals and events that do not squarely fall into just one category or the other. In this lesson, students will begin to explore this conundrum by examining the African National Congress’ strategic decision to move from a position of non-violence to more direct confrontation. Aligned to CCSS: RH.9-10.1, RH.9-10.2, RH.11-12.1, RH.11-12.2, W.9-10.1, W.9-10.2, W.11-12.1, W.11-12.2, SL.9-10.1, SL.9-10.4, SL.11-12.1, SL.11-12.4

Standards

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

Reviews

5.0
2 Reviews
This lesson plan was right on point. I used for 11th grade English students and they ate it up. This site is a great resource.
Cuttyranks777
May 18, 2014
The lesson plan looks great!
cwatnee
December 11, 2013