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Science of NHL Hockey: Newton's Three Laws
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Science of NHL Hockey: Newton's Three Laws

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Grade Level Grades 3-8
Resource Type Activity, Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Science Standards
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About This Lesson

Whether they are sprinting down the ice, smashing into the boards or stopping on a dime, NHL players display an amazing mix of speed and strength. These athletic moves also provide great examples of Newton’s Three Laws of Motion. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

Resources

Files

NHL_LP_Wk_3_MS_Newton3Laws.docx

Activity
February 13, 2020
26.98 KB

NHL_LP_Wk_3_HS_Newton3Laws.docx

Lesson Plan
February 13, 2020
24.83 KB
Legacy Embed

Standards

Apply concepts of density based on area and volume in modeling situations (e.g., persons per square mile, BTUs per cubic foot).
Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.
Apply scientific principles to design, construct, and test a device that either minimizes or maximizes thermal energy transfer.
Construct, use, and present arguments to support the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object.
Construct, use, and present arguments to support the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object.
Plan an investigation to determine the relationships among the energy transferred, the type of matter, the mass, and the change in the average kinetic energy of the particles as measured by the temperature of the sample.
Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down.
Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down.
Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationships of kinetic energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object.
Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.
Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.
Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.
Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.
Make observations and/or measurements of an object's motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.
Make observations and/or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.
Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.
Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

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