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2 Reviews | 175 Downloads

To Be A Drum read by James Earl Jones

Grade Level Grades 1-4
Resource Type Activity
Attributes
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

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This resource includes a video of James Earl Jones reading To Be A Drum along with a Teacher's guide that includes fun, interactive activities for your students. 

To Be A Drum was written by Evelyn Coleman, illustrated by Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson.

Daddy Wes whispers to his two young listeners one morning the story of the 'drum,' the pulse that has moved through the African people and through time and place.

Enjoy this To Be A Drum resource?

Standards

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.
Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

Reviews

2 Reviews
great for reading, considering another ethnicity and beliefs, or revisiting
pwilkins_1708015
June 01, 2021
I could listen to James Earl Jones read all day. He has such a great voice. The resource guide with activities to go along with the story is also very helpful. Thanks for sharing!
birdheim
September 20, 2014