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I'm Not Scared, YOU'RE Scared! read by Seth Meyers

© Storyline Online/SAG-AFTRA Foundation

Grade Level Grades 1-3
Resource Type Activity
Attributes
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

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When you're a bear who is easily scared, it's hard to have friends. Fortunately, Bear has one: Rabbit, who is very brave. One day, Rabbit urges Bear to face his fears and embark on an adventure together. However, things don't entirely go as planned, and the two friends learn the true meaning of bravery.

Equal parts hilarious and touching, this funny tale of adventure, bravery, and daring rescue will both inspire the adventurous spirit in all of us and make us laugh along the way. With the unfailingly witty voice of one of America's favorite comedians, Seth Meyers's debut picture book is bound for hilarity history.

Storyline Online's I'm Not Scared, YOU'RE Scared! is written and read by Seth Meyers, and illustrated by Rob Sayegh Jr..

Consider this resource for your summer reading lists! Learn more about summer reading here.

Standards

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.
Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.
Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

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