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Patterns Printable Collection

Subject ArtsVisual ArtsMathGeometry, Shapes
Grade Level PreK, Grades K-2
Resource Type Activity
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards
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Practice patterns with ABCmouse! From beginner levels to super challenge, this collection includes printables for students at every level. There are printables available in both color and black and white. Create your FREE ABCmouse for Teachers account to access these and thousands more printable and digital resources for preschool through 2nd grade. Visit www.ABCmouse.com/Teachers to sign up.

Resources

Files

Patterns Beginner.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.7 MB
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Patterns Challenge.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.8 MB
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Patterns Super Challenge.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.6 MB
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Shapes Beginner.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Shapes Beginner B&W.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Shapes Challenge B&W.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Shapes Super Challenge.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Shapes Super Challenge B&W.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Healthy Meal.pdf

Activity
February 13, 2020
0.1 MB
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Standards

Mathematically proficient students look closely to discern a pattern or structure. Young students, for example, might notice that three and seven more is the same amount as seven and three more, or they may sort a collection of shapes according to how many sides the shapes have. Later, students will see 7 × 8 equals the well remembered 7 × 5 + 7 × 3, in preparation for learning about the distributive property. In the expression ?² + 9? + 14, older students can see the 14 as 2 × 7 and the 9 as 2 + 7. They recognize the significance of an existing line in a geometric figure and can use the strategy of drawing an auxiliary line for solving problems. They also can step back for an overview and shift perspective. They can see complicated things, such as some algebraic expressions, as single objects or as being composed of several objects. For example, they can see 5 – 3(? – ?)² as 5 minus a positive number times a square and use that to realize that its value cannot be more than 5 for any real numbers ? and ?.
Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.
Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.
Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.

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