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8th Grade math mini-lessons aligned with Khan Academy skills for an entire year!

Subject Math — Expressions and Equations, Functions, Geometry, Ratios and Proportional Relationships, Statistics and Probability, The Number System
Grade Level Grades 6-8
Resource Type
Standards Alignment
NGA Center/CCSSO
License

Attribution Non-commercial ShareAlike

CC (BY-NC-SA)

Description
Resources
Standards
Reviews

Great for distance learning!  Complement your use of Khan Academy with 133 mini-lessons that are aligned with the Khan Academy 8th Grade Math mission.  Spend less time planning and more time teaching and intervening where students are struggling. Lessons are brief and to the point so that students can quickly master skills on Khan Academy and then work on more creative projects that utilize these skills.  

Download these free lessons by clicking on the link below.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/8th-Grade-math-mini-lessons-aligned-with-Khan-Academy-skills-for-an-entire-year-4815556

You can find additional free resources at the link below. 

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Khan-Academy-Support-For-Middle-School-Math

Details of what is included in this compressed zipped file:

1)  A pacing guide that shows Khan Academy skills covered in each unit.  Khan skills are covered mostly sequentially but there is a little jumping around. 

2)  A unit map that identifies key concepts, standards, vocabulary, and essential questions for each unit. 

3)  A description of a daily routine that utilizes the lesson materials provided.  Description includes how students are assessed and how student learning is differentiated.  I found administrators accepted this as my lesson plan when I also had the pacing guide and materials to back it up. Imagine, having lesson plans complete for the entire year!

4)  Lesson materials for each unit.  Lesson materials teach one or two Khan Academy skills in two pages split into a total of 4 sections:

- “Do Now,” a warm-up task that tests prerequisite skills or reviews the skills taught on the prior day. 

- A skill or skills of the day, how students will know they have mastered the skill(s), and an essential question relevant to the skill. 

- Teacher exemplar and students guided work directly related to the skill(s) of the day.

- Exit ticket to assess student understanding of the lesson.

Units are organized as follows:

Unit 1 Numbers and Operations - 28 lessons

Unit 2 Solving Equations with One Unknown - 12 lessons 

Unit 3 Linear Equations and Functions - 28 lessons 

Unit 4 Systems of Linear Equations - 8 lessons 

Unit 5 Geometry - 19 lessons 

Unit 6 Statistics and Probability - 20 lessons

Unit 7 Final Test Preparation - 18 lessons 

These units can be printed as one sheet per day (front and back).  In a conventional teach, guided practice, independent practice, the skill(s) of the day can be assigned in Khan daily after completing this material.  In a student-directed learning or “flipped” classroom the skill(s) of the day can be assigned in Khan Academy BEFORE teaching this material. Students who have mastered the skill before being taught can continue to work ahead on Khan or on a unit project.  These materials can then be printed on demand for students who have not yet mastered the skill(s).

The final unit is a summary of the year that focuses on problem solving skills based upon 20 problem types identified for the grade level.  A separate folder in this folder contains 10 question quizzes that align with this unit as well as materials to track student and class proficiency in the 20 problem types. 

Many practice problems have been pulled from North Carolina released practice tests and EngageNY released practice tests. 

5)  Ten-question quizzes for 20 problem types.  Quizzes and tests assigned and completed within Khan Academy are preferable for tracking student progress.  However, sometimes technology is not available every day.

Resources

Standards

Graph proportional relationships, interpreting the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Compare two different proportional relationships represented in different ways.
Understand that a function is a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output. The graph of a function is the set of ordered pairs consisting of an input and the corresponding output.
Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph (e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear). Sketch a graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been described verbally.
Interpret the equation ? = ?? + ? as defining a linear function, whose graph is a straight line; give examples of functions that are not linear.
Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (?, ?) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.
Use similar triangles to explain why the slope ? is the same between any two distinct points on a non-vertical line in the coordinate plane; derive the equation ? = ?? for a line through the origin and the equation ? = ?? + ? for a line intercepting the vertical axis at ?.
Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology.
Solve real-world and mathematical problems leading to two linear equations in two variables.
Give examples of linear equations in one variable with one solution, infinitely many solutions, or no solutions. Show which of these possibilities is the case by successively transforming the given equation into simpler forms, until an equivalent equation of the form ? = ?, ? = ?, or ? = ? results (where ? and ? are different numbers).
Solve linear equations with rational number coefficients, including equations whose solutions require expanding expressions using the distributive property and collecting like terms.
Know and apply the properties of integer exponents to generate equivalent numerical expressions.
Understand that solutions to a system of two linear equations in two variables correspond to points of intersection of their graphs, because points of intersection satisfy both equations simultaneously.
Solve systems of two linear equations in two variables algebraically, and estimate solutions by graphing the equations. Solve simple cases by inspection.
Use square root and cube root symbols to represent solutions to equations of the form ?² = ? and ?³ = ?, where ? is a positive rational number. Evaluate square roots of small perfect squares and cube roots of small perfect cubes. Know that √2 is irrational.
Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate very large or very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the other.
Compare properties of two functions each represented in a different way (algebraically, graphically, numerically in tables, or by verbal descriptions).
Know the formulas for the volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.
Explain a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse.
Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in real-world and mathematical problems in two and three dimensions.
Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find the distance between two points in a coordinate system.
Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement data, interpreting the slope and intercept.
Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures using coordinates.
Know that numbers that are not rational are called irrational. Understand informally that every number has a decimal expansion; for rational numbers show that the decimal expansion repeats eventually, and convert a decimal expansion which repeats eventually into a rational number.
Use informal arguments to establish facts about the angle sum and exterior angle of triangles, about the angles created when parallel lines are cut by a transversal, and the angle-angle criterion for similarity of triangles.
Use rational approximations of irrational numbers to compare the size of irrational numbers, locate them approximately on a number line diagram, and estimate the value of expressions (e.g., ?²).

Reviews

5.0
1 Review
Great idea!
Great idea!
awall1987_3544677
April 20, 2020