Skip to main content
Julius Caesar Unit (Part 1 of 2)
lesson
637 Downloads
Write a review

Julius Caesar Unit (Part 1 of 2)

Share

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On LinkedIn
Email
Grade Level Grades 9-12
Resource Type Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Common Core State Standards

About This Lesson

Using this unit, students will be able to dissect the process of argument through a variety of suggested texts, analyzing texts for the use of appeals, propaganda, and figurative language. As the students proceed through Julius Caesar, they will work to defend, challenge, or qualify the political actions of Caesar and/or Brutus. This part contains the unit overview as well as lessons 1-3. Aligned to CCSS: RL.9-10.1, RL.9-10.2, RI.9-10.1, RI.9-10.8, RI.9-10.9, W.9-10.1, W.9-10.4, W.9-10.9, SL.9-10.1

Resources

Files

Julius_Caesar_Unit_by_Adam_Keel_Brandy_Shotts_Ashley_Bacon_Part_1_of_2_(1).pdf

Lesson Plan
February 13, 2020
1.84 MB

Standards

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address, the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”), including how they address related themes and concepts.
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Reviews

Write A Review

Be the first to submit a review!

Advertisement