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Google Earth Education: Grades 6-8 Passport Warm Ups

  • Preview of 6thGrade_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
  • Preview of 7thGrade_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
  • Preview of 8thGrade_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
Subject Math — The Number System, Science — Earth and Space Science
Grade Level Grades 6-8
Resource Type Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Achieve, NGA Center/CCSSO
License

Attribution Non-commercial ShareAlike

CC (BY-NC-SA)

Description
Resources
Standards
Reviews

Teachers can use I’m Feeling Lucky and Street View in Google Earth to randomly select a location in the world and relate it to multiple content areas. Teachers can also choose to preselect a location that lends itself well to relevant standards and objectives using Search or Voyager Stories.

• Passport Warm Up is an engaging daily routine in which students review geography, math, science, social studies, ELA and current events objectives.
• This activity is designed to be independent practice for students that requires minimal to no direct instruction on the part of the teacher.
• Teachers can choose from the standards based example questions listed below, or use them as inspiration to generate their own questions.
• To stay within the 15 minute time frame, teachers should use 1-2 questions per subject.

Standards

Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.
Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.
Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems.
Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.
Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (–1)(–1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.
Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number. If ? and ? are integers, then –(?/?) = (–?)/? = ?/(–?). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.
Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers.
Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number terminates in 0s or eventually repeats.
Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.
Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (?, ?) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.
Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology.
Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate very large or very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the other.
Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.
Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.
Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.

Reviews

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Google Earth Education
September 24, 2018