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Google Earth Education: Passport Warm Ups Ages 8-14

  • Google Earth Education: Ages 8-14 Warm Ups
  • Preview of ELA_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
  • Preview of Math_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
  • Preview of SocialStudies_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
  • Preview of Geography_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
  • Preview of Science_Passport_WarmUp.pdf - page 1
Subject English Language Arts — Language, Reading Standards for Informational Text, Writing, Math — Statistics and Probability, The Number System, Science — Earth and Space Science, Social Studies — Geography
Grade Level Grades 6-8
Resource Type Lesson Plan
Standards Alignment
Achieve, NGA Center/CCSSO
License

Attribution Non-commercial ShareAlike

CC (BY-NC-SA)

Description
Resources
Standards
Reviews

Teachers will use I’m Feeling Lucky and Street View in Google Earth to randomly select a location in the world and relate it to English language arts, Geography, Math, Social Studies, and Science concepts. Teachers can also choose to preselect a location that lends itself well to relevant standards and objectives using Search or Voyager Stories.

Resources

Files
Lesson Plan
February 13, 2020
1.3 MB
Lesson Plan
February 13, 2020
1.2 MB
February 13, 2020
1.2 MB
February 13, 2020
0.9 MB

Standards

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.
Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).
Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.
Understand that attributes belonging to a category of two-dimensional figures also belong to all subcategories of that category.
Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.
Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.
Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems.
Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable. Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation.
Use rational approximations of irrational numbers to compare the size of irrational numbers, locate them approximately on a number line diagram, and estimate the value of expressions (e.g., ?²).
Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.
Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.
Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (?, ?) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.
Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology.
Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.
Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth's features.
Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.
Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.
Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.
Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

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